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What is a Fallopian Tube?

Illustration detailing the expert fertility assessment of fallopian tubes offered at London Pregnancy Clinic.

Fallopian Tubes: all you need to know

Discovering the importance of fallopian tubes for fertility.

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Explore the critical role of fallopian tubes, or uterine tubes, in pregnancy and fertility. This post delves into their anatomy, function, and common issues affecting fertility, providing essential insights for expectant mothers and those planning pregnancy.

Welcome to our comprehensive guide on the fallopian tubes, an essential component of the female reproductive system. We also explore common pathologies that affect these tubes, leading to infertility issues and complications like ectopic pregnancies. Our esteemed in-house gynae team, brings their extensive knowledge and expertise to this discussion, providing invaluable insights into the significance of maintaining fallopian tube health. Join us as we unfold the mysteries of the fallopian tubes and their vital function in the miracle of life.

What are Fallopian Tubes

In the female body, the pelvis houses two vital structures known as fallopian tubes. One on either side of the uterus. These tubes act as pathways, connecting the ovaries to the uterus. Each fallopian tube is made up of four distinct parts: the infundibulum, fimbriae, ampulla, and isthmus. The fimbriae are delicate, finger-like extensions that gently guide the egg from the ovary into the tube. 

The Role of Fallopian tubes in Pregnancy

Moreover, fallopian tubes are critical in the earliest stages of pregnancy, integral to the reproductive process, and serve a trio of critical functions. They are the conduits for egg transportation from the ovaries to the uterus and the venue where fertilisation typically occurs. Post-fertilisation, these tubes facilitate the journey of the fertilised egg to the uterus, setting the stage for implantation and the progression of pregnancy. The health and integrity of the fallopian tubes are paramount for successful conception as they are closely linked to fertility. Problems with these tubes are a common reason why some women may have difficulty getting pregnant.

Uterine Tube Pathologies & Infertility

According to a report, nearly one-third of infertility cases are attributed to issues with the fallopian tubes, including various pathologies like inflammation and obstructions. Damage to the tube’s cilia can hinder the movement of sperm or egg, contributing to infertility. Additionally, sexually transmitted infections are a known cause of these tubal issues. Let’s dive into the specific pathologies that can manifest.

Salpingitis

Salpingitis, an inflammation in the fallopian tubes, often forms part of wider pelvic inflammatory diseases (PIDs). Its hallmark is a thickened tube in the isthmus area, known as salpingitis isthmica nodosa. This condition can resemble endometriosis, potentially leading to fertility blockages or raising ectopic pregnancy risks.

During diagnosis, doctors first look for tenderness and swelling. They may conduct blood and urine tests to spot infection indicators. Swab tests from the vagina and cervix help identify specific bacterial infections. Ultrasound scans of the fallopian tubes and reproductive tract are common. A crucial test, the hysterosalpingogram, uses a special X-ray and dye through the cervix to detect tubal blockages.

Untreated, salpingitis can cause long-term fertility issues and increase ectopic pregnancy chances. Symptoms vary, including lower abdominal pain, nausea, and fever; sometimes, no symptoms appear initially. Antibiotics typically treat this condition, but severe cases might require surgery or IVF. Seeking medical advice early is vital to prevent serious outcomes. Early detection and treatment significantly aid in managing salpingitis effectively.

Fallopian Tube Blockage & Narrowing

Addressing fallopian tube obstructions can significantly boost pregnancy chances. These blockages may develop in various parts of the tube – proximal, distal, or mid-segmental. Testing the tubes’ full functionality presents challenges, yet assessing their patency (openness) is possible with hysterosalpingography, laparoscopy with dye, or hysterosalpingo contrast sonography (HyCoSy). During surgical evaluations, specialists examine the tubes and introduce a dye, such as methylene blue, into the uterus to test its passage through the tubes when the cervix is closed.

Research published in PubMed indicates a notable prevalence of tubal obstruction: 19.1% in primary infertility cases and 28.7% in secondary infertility scenarios. The study highlights cornual blockage’s predominance in primary infertility, whereas complete hydrosalpinx and peritubal adhesions appear less frequently. Due to the frequent link between tubal disease and Chlamydia infection, Chlamydia antibody screening is now a cost-effective approach for identifying possible tubal pathologies.

At London Pregnancy Clinic, we conduct the HyCoSy procedure. This test evaluates fallopian tube functionality by injecting a special dye and monitoring its flow. It also assesses the womb for abnormalities affecting pregnancy implantation. Additionally, we use dye and ultrasound scans to check for fallopian tube blockages or abnormalities. Discover more through the slider below, offering further insights into our advanced diagnostic techniques.

  • Graphic explaining the expert fertility assessment of fallopian tubes offered at London Pregnancy Clinic.

    Fallopian Tubes

  • Educational diagram of female reproductive anatomy focusing on the fallopian tubes provided by London Pregnancy Clinic.

    Fallopian tube diagram

  • Illustration detailing the phases of the menstrual cycle as part of fertility education by London Pregnancy Clinic.

    Menstrual Cycle

  • Infographic showing statistics on blocked fallopian tube prevalence in women, as part of London Pregnancy Clinic's fertility resources.

    Stats on blocked fallopian tube

  • Explanation of the HYCOSY scan procedure for checking fallopian tube blockage, offered by London Pregnancy Clinic.

    HyCoSy

  • Image of Mr. Prashant Purohit with text highlighting London Pregnancy Clinic's expertise in fertility and gynaecology ultrasound.

    Mr. Prashant Purohit specialist gynaecologist

Ectopic Pregnancy

Statistics and Locations of Ectopic Pregnancies: Ectopic pregnancies, which occur in about 1%-2% of all pregnancies, predominantly implant in the fallopian tubes, with over 98% of cases occurring there. Within the fallopian tubes, the distribution of ectopic pregnancies varies: approximately 75% happen in the ampullary segment, 13% in the isthmic segment, and around 12% in the fimbrial segment. These statistics highlight the critical nature of monitoring tubal health.

Fertilisation and its Relation to Ectopic Pregnancies: It’s important to note that fertilisation typically occurs in the ampulla, the same section of the fallopian tube where the majority of ectopic pregnancies are found. This correlation emphasises the need for awareness and early detection in cases of suspected ectopic pregnancy, as the ampulla is a common site for both normal fertilisation and ectopic implantation.

Understanding the statistics and locations of ectopic pregnancies in the fallopian tubes is crucial. It not only sheds light on the commonality and risks associated with these pregnancies but also underscores the importance of early ultrasound pregnancy scans for detection and intervention. The earlier you scan the quicker we can detect an ectopic pregnancy meaning that we can begin this from week 6 of pregnancy.

Pregnant with Just One Fallopian Tube?

Typically, women possess two fallopian tubes for transporting the mature egg from the ovary to the uterus, where it may encounter sperm. However, a single healthy tube can efficiently undertake this task. Remarkably, up to 85% of women aged 22-28 with only one tube successfully conceive within two years of trying, even following an ectopic pregnancy.

If you have a blocked tube due to scarring, trauma, or a previous ectopic pregnancy, your pregnancy prospects remain normal, considering other health factors. Loss of a fallopian tube might result from pelvic surgery due to infection, tumours, or a past ectopic pregnancy. In some instances, women are naturally born with just one tube. Still, pregnancy is achievable with one tube, provided you have a functioning ovary, you’re ovulating and the fallopian tube is in good health.

If you’re struggling to conceive or have a history of fallopian tube issues, it’s wise to consult your gynaecologist or a reproductive endocrinologist. They can offer a thorough evaluation to guide your next steps. Remember, one healthy fallopian tube can effectively support your journey to motherhood.

Conclusion

Mr. Prashant Purohit, our dedicated in-house gynaecologist at London Pregnancy Clinic, emphasises the need for awareness and timely medical consultation to address these concerns. His expertise in managing these conditions reflects our clinic’s commitment to providing comprehensive care and support to women facing fertility challenges. Understanding the complexities of the fallopian tubes is not just about medical knowledge; it’s about empowering women with the information they need to make informed decisions about their reproductive health. We encourage you, readers to stay vigilant about their gynaecological well-being and seek expert guidance when needed. Remember, early detection and treatment are key to overcoming obstacles on the path to motherhood.

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Ultrasound Scans During Pregnancy

Minimalist flat design illustration of a very simple ultrasound room at the London Pregnancy Clinic - ultrasound Scans During Pregnancy.

Ultrasound scans during pregnancy

Discovering the importance of ultrasound scanning to demystify it.

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Unravel the mysteries of ultrasound scans during pregnancy. Understand their significance, what to expect, and their role in ensuring a healthy pregnancy. Experience the joy and reassurance that comes with seeing your baby’s first images.

Embarking on the journey of pregnancy is a thrilling yet complex adventure, filled with excitement, anticipation, and a myriad of questions. Among the most common queries we encounter at our clinic is the significance of ultrasound scans during this special time. Understanding the importance of these scans, often shrouded in mystery, can profoundly change perceptions, transforming them from just a clinical procedure into an invaluable and cherished part of the pregnancy experience. These scans can be done from week 6, as this is when we reach the first major developmental milestone.

The Role of Ultrasound in Pregnancy

Ultrasound scans, a window to your womb, offer a non-invasive peek at your developing baby. Ultrasound technology has revolutionised prenatal care since its inception. Initially utilised in the 1950s for gynaecological purposes, its application in monitoring fetal development during pregnancy was a groundbreaking discovery that has shaped modern obstetrics. The development of the first contact B-mode scanner opened a new window into the womb, allowing for the visualisation of the fetus and transforming prenatal care.

This innovation marked the beginning of using ultrasound to monitor the baby’s development, detect potential abnormalities, and even predict birth weight discordance in twin pregnancies. Today, ultrasound scans are a routine and indispensable part of prenatal care. Most women are offered at least two standard scans during their pregnancy. The first scan, usually conducted between 10 and 13 weeks, is crucial for confirming the due date and checking the baby’s heartbeat. The second scan, typically between 18 and 21 weeks, focuses on assessing the baby’s growth and anatomy in more detail.

What to Expect During an Ultrasound

Understanding what happens during an ultrasound can ease any apprehensions and make the experience more enjoyable. At London Pregnancy Clinic, we encourage patients to ask questions and see this as an opportunity to educate them about the wonders of ultrasound and pregnancy.

Procedure: You’ll recline on a comfortable bed in our serene scanning room. While ‘internal’ and ‘external’ aren’t official medical terms, they are commonly used to describe ultrasound methods. An internal scan, often a transvaginal ultrasound, involves a probe inserted into the vagina for detailed pelvic images. Whereas, the external scan is an abdominal ultrasound, where a transducer glides over the abdomen to visualise the baby and internal organs. Our specialists excel in both types of ultrasounds, providing thorough care and support throughout your pregnancy.

Scanning: While our specialists move the transducer, you may feel slight pressure, but it’s generally a painless process. Traditional 2D ultrasounds provide clear images of your baby’s structure, while advanced 3D and 4D technologies can offer more detailed views, such as facial features or specific organs.

Duration: A standard ultrasound typically lasts about 20 minutes. However, at London Pregnancy Clinic our scans, are more comprehensive and may take up to 45/60 minutes. Occasionally, obtaining clear ultrasound images can be challenging. Factors like the baby’s position, movement, body composition, or higher body weight might affect image clarity. However, this is usually no cause for concern. To enhance image quality, we might ask you to take a short walk. This can encourage the baby to shift position. 

Results: At LPC we use Tricefy to share the images and reports with you. It’s important to note that ultrasounds are safe, with no known risks to either the baby or the mother. However, they are an important diagnostic tool, providing valuable information for any potential medical decisions.

NHS Ultrasound Scans

In England, the NHS provides crucial ultrasound scans during pregnancy at key stages. Hospitals in England offer at least two ultrasound scans, conducted by fetal medicine practitioners, which include the following:

  • 12-Week Scan (Dating Scan): Offered between 11 and 14 weeks, this scan estimates your due date. It may include a nuchal translucency (NT) scan (this is an NHS scan not to be confused with our private Nuchal Scan), part of the combined screening test for Down’s syndrome (Trisomy 21). This screening includes a blood test and an ultrasound scan. The scan measures the fluid at the back of the baby’s neck, also known as nuchal translucency. However, unlike Non-Invasive Prenatal Testing (NIPT), it is not considered the most advanced and modern way to screen for Down’s and other chromosomal syndromes.
  • 20-Week Screening Scan (NHS Anomaly Scan): Conducted between 18 and 21 weeks, this scan, also known as the anomaly or mid-pregnancy scan, checks for 11 physical conditions in the baby. These include Spina Bifida, Anencephaly, Cleft Lip, Diaphragmatic Hernia, Exomphalos, Serious Cardiac Abnormalities, Bilateral Renal Agenesis, Lethal Skeletal Dysplasia, Edwards’ Syndrome (Trisomy 18), Patau’s Syndrome (Trisomy 13), and Acrania. 

LPC Ultrasound Scans

Following the essential scans offered by the NHS, the London Pregnancy Clinic presents a spectrum of specialised ultrasound scans for expectant mothers. While we endorse the significance of NHS scans, our clinic provides additional, detailed insights into your baby’s development. We are renowned for our proficiency in early anomaly detection but we offer an extensive scan list designed by Dr Fred Ushakov:

Our clinic’s dedication to fetal medicine is evident in our use of the latest imaging technologies, including 2D, 3D, and 4D scans. These technologies allow us to screen various aspects of your baby’s growth and development, providing reassurance and a deeper connection with your baby throughout your pregnancy journey.

Ultrasound scans during pregnancy FAQs


  • Difference between internal and external ultrasound scans

    Internal Scan (transvaginal scan) – involves inserting a specially designed probe into the vagina. Provides high-resolution images of the pelvic organs, including the uterus, ovaries, and in early pregnancy, the developing fetus. Commonly used in early pregnancy stages for clearer and more detailed images. In an abdominal ultrasound, a sonographer applies a water-soluble gel to your belly and uses a transducer to glide over the skin, sending sound waves that create images of the baby.

    External Scan (abdominal scan) – this method involves moving a transducer over the abdomen’s surface. It captures images of internal organs, including the developing baby, placenta, and uterus during pregnancy. Used throughout pregnancy, especially in the second and third trimesters, to monitor the baby’s growth and development. In a transvaginal ultrasound, a longer and thinner transducer is gently inserted into the vagina to get closer to the uterus, offering detailed images, especially in early pregnancy.

  • How many ultrasound scans can I have during pregnancy?

    During pregnancy, the number of ultrasound scans you can have varies:

    • NHS Scans: Standard NHS care includes two scans. These check the baby’s size, detect abnormalities, determine the due date, and monitor growth.

    • London Pregnancy Clinic Options: We offer additional scans for more comprehensive screening and reassurance:

      • Early Fetal Reassurance: Includes 2 early scans for early health screening.
      • NHS Complementing Scan: Features 3 scans alongside the standard NHS 12-week and 20-week scans.
      • Comprehensive Scan Package: Provides 6 scans, ideal for high-risk, IVF pregnancies, or those after a miscarriage.

    While you can theoretically have as many scans as you wish, it’s about balancing the benefits with your time and energy. Our packages at London Pregnancy Clinic are designed to complement NHS care, providing peace of mind throughout your pregnancy journey.

  • Can an ultrasound scan harm me or my unborn baby?

    Patients are often concerned about whether or not ultrasound scans harm the fetus during its development. Currently, there are no known side effects and it is widely accepted that ultrasound scans are a procedure safe for pregnancy. There are no known risks to the baby or the mother from having an ultrasound scan, but you must consider carefully whether to have the scan or not.

  • Why scan in early pregnancy?

    We are specialists in early pregnancy scans. Undergoing an ultrasound scan early in pregnancy not only provides essential health information but also plays a vital role in future decision-making. If the scan reveals any anomalies or concerns, it can be a challenging time for you and your partner. Having this knowledge at an early stage allows you both more time to understand the situation, consider your options, and make informed decisions. It’s a process that requires care, support, and thoughtful consideration, and our team at the clinic is committed to providing compassionate guidance every step of the way. An ultrasound scan in early pregnancy is crucial for several reasons:

    • Confirmation of Pregnancy: It confirms the existence of an intrauterine pregnancy, ensuring the pregnancy is developing in the right place.
    • Establishing Gestational Age: It helps determine the gestational age of the fetus, which is key for calculating the estimated due date.
    • Detection of Multiple Pregnancies: Ultrasound can reveal if you’re expecting twins, triplets, or more, which is important for managing a healthy pregnancy.
    • Assessing Pregnancy Health: It checks the health of the pregnancy, including the heartbeat of the fetus, and can identify potential issues early on.
    • Screening for Chromosomal Abnormalities: Early scans can be part of screening for chromosomal abnormalities like Down syndrome.
    • Reassurance: An early scan provides reassurance, especially for those with a history of miscarriage, IVF, or fertility issues.
    • Planning for Future Care: The information gathered assists healthcare providers in planning appropriate care throughout the pregnancy.
  • Why should I do a private ultrasound scan on top of my NHS scans?

    Choosing to have a private ultrasound scan at the London Pregnancy Clinic, in addition to your NHS scans, offers several benefits that complement your comprehensive pregnancy care:

    1. Early Reassurance: Our private scans can start as early as 10 weeks, providing early reassurance about the health and development of your baby. This early insight reduces the waiting time typically associated with NHS scans.

    2. Comprehensive Anomaly Screening: We offer detailed and comprehensive screening for fetal anomalies. These in-depth scans supplement the standard NHS checks, offering a more thorough examination.

    3. Post-20-Week Scans: After the standard 20-week NHS scan, our clinic provides additional scans to monitor your baby’s position, growth, and overall development. These scans can offer reassurance during the later stages of pregnancy.

    4. Availability of NIPT: Non-Invasive Prenatal Testing (NIPT), a valuable screening for chromosomal abnormalities, is more readily available in our clinic. While the NHS offers NIPT under certain conditions, our clinic provides more accessible options for all expectant mothers.

    5. Flexibility and Personalisation: Private scans offer increased flexibility with appointment scheduling, allowing you to choose the most convenient times and dates. This flexibility ensures that your appointments fit seamlessly into your lifestyle.

    6. Comfortable and Personal Experience: We pride ourselves on creating a patient-centred experience, ensuring each visit is as comfortable and reassuring as possible.

    It’s important to continue with your scheduled NHS scans for a complete overview of your pregnancy’s progress. Private scans at the London Pregnancy Clinic are designed to enhance and complement the care you receive through the NHS, offering additional peace of mind and a more tailored approach to your prenatal care journey.

  • How to prepare for a pregnancy scan?

    Some people think it’s a silly question but we don’t think so! For us preparing for a pregnancy scan is as straightforward as:

    Being Comfortable: Wear loose, comfortable clothing like a top with trousers or a skirt. This choice aids in easy access for abdominal scans and comfort during transvaginal scans. Avoid dresses for pelvic ultrasounds. Instead, choose separates that can be easily adjusted or removed as needed.

    Bringing a Partner: You’re welcome to bring your partner for support during the scan.


Conclusion

Understanding the importance of ultrasound scans demystifies this crucial aspect of prenatal care. It’s more than just a medical procedure; it’s a journey of discovery and connection with your baby. For more information or to schedule your ultrasound, visit our scans page. Our team at London Pregnancy Clinic is here to guide and support you every step of the way, ensuring a healthy and joyful pregnancy experience.

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Early Fetal Scan Explained

Graphic of Early Fetal Anomaly Scan. An illustration of a mother thinking about the normal development of her baby's brain.

Early Fetal Scan Explained

Shaz Khojasteh is an advanced Specialist Sonographer in Fetal Medicine, Gynaecology and Fertility in Central London. Gynae Scans and Follicle Tracking Scans in London.

Miss Shaz Khojasteh on why scanning at 12-16 weeks is important for Mothers.

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The early stages of pregnancy are a time of wonder and crucial development. At London Pregnancy Clinic, we offer a thorough Early Fetal Scan to nurture early prenatal care and provide expectant parents with detailed insights into their baby’s early development.

When I joined the London Pregnancy Clinic, the importance of the Early Fetal Scan became vividly clear through experiences with expectant parents. This critical scan, offering a glimpse of their baby’s developing heartbeat and form, goes beyond just a medical check-up; it’s an early, reassuring window into the baby’s well-being and a vital tool for detecting potential anomalies. At the clinic, we do more than just scans; we provide a journey of reassurance, care, and emotional support, making each early pregnancy scan a crucial, heartwarming step in the beautiful journey of parenthood.

The Basics of Early Fetal Scan

Performed between the crucial 12-16 week mark, the Early Fetal Scan is an essential part of your prenatal care regimen. It provides a detailed look at your baby’s development, including their physical structure, heart rate, and movement. This scan also assesses the health of the placenta, which is vital for your baby’s nourishment and growth. 

Importance of Early Fetal Scan

Early Detection of Anomalies: This scan plays a critical role in the early detection of over 100 different structural abnormalities. These include severe heart defects, early brain anomalies, spina bifida, lethal skeletal dysplasias, and other serious structural conditions. The scan even has the precision to detect minute details such as missing fingers, providing a comprehensive view of the baby’s development.

Beyond Structural Analysis: While this scan is adept at identifying structural abnormalities, it’s important to note that ultrasound alone cannot detect chromosomal conditions. A baby may appear structurally normal but still have chromosomal defects like Down’s syndrome (Trisomy 21). If you haven’t already done this with an earlier pregnancy scan like our 10 Week Scan, we strongly recommend doing a non-invasive prenatal test (NIPT). Complementing our 12-16 week pregnancy scan with NIPT will help identify such chromosomal syndromes and is currently the best screening option available and it is part of our signature Ultrasound plus NIPT Dual Approach.

12-16 week Ultrasound Images of the baby

Here are some of the pictures you can get of your baby at 12 to 16 weeks of pregnancy using our state-of-the-art Voluson ultrasound machine.

  • Ultrasound scan image of a baby at 13 weeks. You can see the amazing definition of the scan, showing the individual fingers of the baby. At this stage the baby is about the size of a plum (7cm).

    13 weeks of pregnancy

    Captured via ultrasound at 13 weeks, this image showcases the incredible clarity of our scanning technology, revealing even the tiny fingers of the baby in amazing detail.

  • 3D ultrasound image of a 14-week-old fetus, showcasing detailed features and development

    14 weeks of pregnancy

    3D ultrasound image of a 14-week-old fetus, showcasing clear features and a serene pose often described by patients as the ‘sucking of the thumb in the womb’.

Your Experience with Early Fetal Scans

We achieve the best results by combining external (transabdominal) and optional internal (transvaginal) scans, adapting to factors like womb position, fetal position, and maternal abdominal wall thickness. While our high-resolution transducers often suffice with transabdominal scans, around 10% of women with a retroflexed uterus may benefit more from a transvaginal scan. We ensure you’re fully informed and comfortable with your scanning choices. You can read more about what to expect during a pregnancy scan here.

Your  frequently asked questions about Early Fetal Scan:

When should I do this early pregnancy scan? 

Schedule Scan at 14-16 Weeks: Post 10 Week Scan and NIPT for a detailed anomaly check, as the baby’s advanced development at this stage allows for more comprehensive screening.

Early Scan at 12-13 Weeks for First-Time Checks: If no early anomaly scan was performed by 10 weeks, opt for this ultrasound scan combined with NIPT for effective Down’s syndrome screening.

Address Unclear NHS 12 week scan Findings with Echocardiography: For inconclusive first trimester results, like increased NT, our Early Baby Heart Scan provides an in-depth heart evaluation and a thorough early baby scan.

Can an early fetal scan detect all fetal anomalies? While no single test can diagnose all fetal anomalies, our early baby scan at London Pregnancy Clinic identifies many, particularly severe abnormalities that might lead to disability or require early intervention. However, certain anomalies, especially those affecting late brain or heart development, may not be detectable at 12-13 weeks. We recommend follow-up scans at 20-22 weeks and 28-29 weeks for comprehensive monitoring, alongside maintaining your NHS scan schedule, to ensure the best care for your pregnancy

  • Promotional graphic from London Pregnancy Clinic on pioneering the Early Fetal Scan and the story behind this groundbreaking scan

    London Pregnancy Clinic Scan Overview

    London Pregnancy Clinic Scan Overview

  • Infographic highlighting the dilemma of scan timing in the first and second trimester for early prenatal care

    Why we need 12 to 16 week private pregnancy scan?

    Why we need 12 to 16 week private pregnancy scan?

  • Educational graphic explaining the 12-16 week ultrasound scan process, screening for over 100 anomalies at 12 weeks of pregnancy.

    What is Early Fetal Scan?

    What is Early Fetal Scan?

  • Informative diagram showcasing the reasons for early fetal scanning at 12 weeks and its importance in detecting fetal anomalies.

    Why do Early Fetal Scan?

    Why do Early Fetal Scan?

  • Timeline showing the optimal period for the EF Scan in the first trimester, aligning with developmental milestones

    Best time for EF Scan?

    Best time for EF Scan?

  • Closing graphic from London Pregnancy Clinic thanking readers and inviting dialogue about the importance of early fetal scans.

    Get in touch

    Get in touch

Conclusion

The Early Fetal Scan is a pivotal part of your pregnancy journey, offering invaluable insights for peace of mind and informed decision-making. At London Pregnancy Clinic, we’re committed to providing detailed, compassionate care during this vital phase of your pregnancy.

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